Three Ways to Color Easter Eggs Using One Completely Natural Dye

Greek, Estonian and Russian Easter Eggs

Maybe I should have named this post - An Ode To An Onion Skin!

All of these lovely Easter Eggs - dyed using nothing more than yellow onion skins! How much more natural can you get?

Recently I came across three ways to color eggs for celebrating Easter - Estonian, Russian and Greek! And they all employed the same exact dying agent - yellow onion skins! You know me! I had to try them all. And THAT was too much fun!

My very first Estonian Easter Eggs

Estonian Easter Eggs - hands down my very favorite! Must make some using blown out eggs so I can keep them.

These are fresh eggs boiled in the usual way with one tiny exception - before being dipped into boiling water, they are wrapped in yellow onion peels!

You can find the full tutorial right here on Nami Nami - one of my favorite cooking blogs.

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Once the dying process is completed you will have a lovely little surprise package to open.

Kids will get a huge kick out of opening each onion peel wrapped package to see what happened inside! Every single egg will be different.

Estonian Onion skin Dyed Easter Egg

 

Estonian Onion Skin Dyed Easter Egg

Why did I only save enough skins for two eggs? I could have done this all afternoon!

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Mention was made in the Nami Nami post of another method using onion skins - a simpler method used in Russia and the Ukraine. Natash shares the how-to on her cooking blog Natasha's Kitchen.

Dying eggs with this method is easier and quicker and each egg develops a slightly different shade.

I do like the soft, natural color and am thinking blown out eggs colored using this method would be a great base for future Pysangle or Faux Pysansky eggs!

Greek "Red" Easter Eggs

Aaaaaaaah... those lovely, brilliant deep red Greek eggs! I have always wondered how the Greeks got that deep color.

Yellow Onion Skins! Here is the tutorial on About.com.

Dare I admit that I was seriously doubting this one all during the process until I pulled these lovely deep pepper red eggs from the dye bath?

Shortly after my little egg dying adventure, I found this post on Lavender and Lovage where the egg dying method I mentioned above as traditional Estonian is described as being old English! I am beginning to think this method of using onion peels may be quite common throughout Europe.

In any case, pop over to see Karen's gorgeous eggs! So beautiful.

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I had almost completely forgotten that three years ago I actually tested out several fruits and veggies as potential egg dye options! Pop over if you are curious about which is what.

Guess which one is dyed using onion skins? I tried lots of things from spinach to blueberries but found most of the results too subtle for my taste - except the blueberry!  LOVED the blueberry egg!

Don't get me wrong -  the subtle colored eggs make my eyes happy - but I prefer them to be "hen laid"! Like these Amy Grennell collected from her very own hen house! Beautiful indeed. Don't you just love the way she laid them out like a rainbow?

Boiling eggs wrapped in onion skins in a color bath instead of water can produce some very cool results!  Turn your Easter egg dying into a science experiment or make a nest full of Dinosaur Eggs!

Happy "Easter is almost here"!

Great ideas for the next

Great ideas for the next Easter! I also use garlic peels too. I just wash them and flatten them with a rolling pin. They work too.

Dear Pam, I'm about a year

Dear Pam, I'm about a year late with my thank you message - but how sweet of you to like my blog and try out this method of dyeing eggs.

Those English, trying to claim this way of dyeing eggs? I lived in the UK for seven years (in Scotland, not England, admittedly) and not once saw I anyone even mention real eggs during Easter - it was all about chocolate eggs :D

We are absolutely doing this

We are absolutely doing this with the kids!

Interesting, I had heard of

Interesting, I had heard of using onion skin to dye yarn. I didn't know you could use them to dye eggs.

Thanks for the links! I'm

Thanks for the links! I'm hoping to try this next week during the boys' spring break. :)

Interesting, thank you! :) I

Interesting, thank you! :)
I want to experiment with coloured eggs this easter!

How Fun! I've always been

How Fun! I've always been curious about trying natural dye for eggs.

Have you tried red onion

Have you tried red onion skins? I have heard they produce quite pretty results.

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